Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs

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Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs

According to the Swiss-registered organization, Medicines for Malaria Venture, chloroquine is a derivative of quinine, which French chemists in 1820 isolated from the bark of the cinchona tree found in South America, employing it as a treatment for fevers.
German scientists created the synthetic chloroquine in 1934 as part of a class of anti-malarials, MMV said, and chloroquine and DDT became “the two principal weapons in WHO’s global eradication malaria campaign” following World War II, the organization said.
Hydroxychloroquine is what’s known as an analog of chloroquine, meaning the two have similar structures but different chemical and biological properties. The former is considered the less toxic derivative, according to studies.
It’s given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and the blood disorder porphyria cutanea tarda, the CDC said.

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what to know about the potential coronavirus drugs